History and Art History

College of Humanities and Social Sciences

HIST 643: Religion and Society in the Reformation Era

The University Catalog is the authoritative source for information on courses. The Schedule of Classes is the authoritative source for information on classes scheduled for this semester. See the Schedule for the most up-to-date information and see Patriot web to register for classes.

Section Information from the Schedule of Classes for Fall 2012

HIST 643-001:
Religion and Society in the Reformation Era  —  Mack P. Holt

07:20 PM to 10:00 PM M —  Krug Hall 19

This course will examine the major religious reformations of the sixteenth century - both protestant and catholic - and will look at the social implications as well as theological differences of these reformations. The emphasis will be on how the current historiography - dominated by the new methodological innovations of social and cultural historians - has modified the traditional narrative of "The Reformation." MA Students will read recent monographs (generally one book per week) and write short 2 pp. reviews of the books read. There will also be a take-home final exam that attempts to tie together the reading. PhD students will write a 20-25 pp. research paper instead of the short book reviews. Reading for the class will likely include John Bossy, Christianity in the West, 1400-1700, Lyndal Roper, The Holy Household, Natalie Davis, Society and Culture in Early Modern France, Barbara Diefendorf, Beneath the Cross: Catholics and Huguenots in Sixteenth-Century Paris, John O'Malley, The First Jesuits, Carlo Ginzburg, The Cheese and the Worms, Eamon Duffy, The Stripping of the Altars, Ethan Shagan, Popular Politics and the English Reformation, , Paul Seaver, Wallington's World, Benjamin Kaplan's Divided by Faith, and Malcolm Gaskill's Witchfinders. This course fulfills the “Origins to 1789” distribution requirement in European history.

Course Information from the University Catalog

Credits: 3

The Reformation, ca. 1500 to 1650, was a time of major religious, intellectual, social, and political upheaval in European history. Investigates reasons for changes, and effects on European society. First half focuses on Germany, but major events throughout Europe are studied.

Prerequisites:

Graduate standing.

Print Friendly and PDF